College Football
NCAAF News Wire
  • Ray Lewis III arrested on sexual-conduct charges
    By The Sports Xchange / Friday, April 29, 2016

    Coastal Carolina cornerback Ray Lewis III, the son of former NFL star Ray Lewis, was arrested Friday and charged with felony third-degree criminal sexual conduct.

    • Lewis allegedly sexually assaulted two women at an apartment on Jan. 23 near the campus in Conway, S.C.

      According to a police report, Lewis sexually assaulted an 18-year-old female who he knew was "incapacitated and/or physically helpless" while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

      Lewis is also accused of sexually assaulting a 19-year-old female, but he has not yet been charged with a crime in regard to that allegation. That investigation is ongoing.

      Lewis, 20, turned himself in on Friday and was released 90 minutes later on $10,000 bond.

      He also was indefinitely suspended from the Coastal Carolina football team.

      "Once CCU became aware of an incident, the University immediately began facilitating the administrative investigation, which includes requests to Conway Police Department for the police report and other information pertaining to this case," the university said in a statement. "The University obtained the arrest warrant today.

      "Immediately upon arrest, Ray Lewis III was suspended indefinitely from the football team. The University continues its administrative investigation process."

      Lewis had 19 tackles as a sophomore in 2015 in his first season with the Chanticleers. He transferred from Miami, the alma mater of his father.

      Lewis' famous father had his own issues with the law back in 2000. The Baltimore Ravens standout was charged with two counts of murder after two people were stabbed to death outside a nightclub after the Super Bowl in Atlanta.

      Lewis eventually pled guilty to obstruction of justice. Lewis received a year of probation and was fined $250,000 by the NFL.

      His stellar career with the Baltimore Ravens ended in 2013 when he retired.

  • Ole Miss vows to 'aggressively investigate' Tunsil's admission
    By The Sports Xchange / Friday, April 29, 2016

    Ole Miss vowed to "aggressively investigate" possible NCAA violations after Laremy Tunsil, the offensive tackle taken by the Miami Dolphins with the No. 13 NFL Draft pick, admitted he took money from a coach while playing for the Rebels.

    • "The university is aware of the reports from the NFL Draft regarding Laremy Tunsil and potential NCAA violations during his time at Ole Miss," the university said in a statement late Thursday night. "Like we do whenever an allegation is brought to our attention or a potential violation is self-discovered, we will aggressively investigate and fully cooperate with the NCAA and the SEC."

      Tunsil spoke at a news conference after he was taken by the Dolphins on Thursday night in Chicago and an alleged hack of his Instagram and Twitter accounts.

      Tunsil tumbled to the Dolphins after a video appeared on his Twitter account just minutes before the start of the draft showing him smoking marijuana through a bong while wearing a gas mask.

      "It was a mistake. It happened years ago," Tunsil told the NFL Network of the video. "Someone hacked my Twitter account. It's a crazy world, things happen for a reason. I'm glad to be in Miami."

      Tunsil said he did not know who posted the video. In addition to the video, Tunsil was asked about screenshots of a text conversation he allegedly had with Ole Miss director of football operations John Miller in which Tunsil asked for money.

      "I made a mistake. That happened," Tunsil said.

      When asked if that meant he had taken money from a coach, Tunsil said, "I'd have to say yeah."

      Head coach Hugh Freeze was in the green room with Tunsil and fellow NFL first-round picks from Ole Miss -- wide receiver Laquon Treadwell (23rd overall to the Minnesota Vikings) and defensive tackle Robert Nkemdiche (29th overall to the Arizona Cardinals).

      Ole Miss received a notice of allegations from the NCAA in January. The notice includes violations that led to Tunsil being suspended by the NCAA for the first seven games last season for accepting improper benefits.

  • NCAA reverses ban on satellite camps
    By The Sports Xchange / Thursday, April 28, 2016

    The NCAA board of directors on Thursday reversed a decision on football satellite camps and waived the ban that was put in place earlier this month after some schools complained about the practice.

    • The satellite camps were called into question during the past few months by Alabama coach Nick Saban and several conferences, including the SEC, who spoke out against them. The camps and clinics are used mainly during the summer by northern schools, primarily the Big Ten, in the South and fertile recruiting regions.

      Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh and Ohio State coach Urban Meyer were among those complained after the ban, which restricted coaches from working at camps outside of a 50-mile radius from their schools, was put in place. Harbaugh made headlines last season by conducting satellite camps and working at clinics in the South.

      "It's clear that the membership has differing views on this subject, and the Council appreciates the Board's insights into this important issue," said Northwestern athletic director Jim Phillips, who serves as the council chairman. "This review will provide an opportunity to identify the most effective ways prospective student-athletes can have their academic and athletic credentials evaluated by schools across the country."

      The SEC said in a statement that it disagreed with the reversal, but its schools will be permitted to hold summer camps. The ACC also will allow its coaches to work at the camps.

      "While we are disappointed with the NCAA governance process result, we respect the Board of Directors' decision and are confident SEC football programs will continue to be highly effective in their recruiting efforts," SEC commissioner Greg Sankey said.

      The NCAA said in a statement that it will ask the Division I council, which enacted the ban, to research the FBS recruiting process and report back to the board of directors with recommendations by Sept. 1.

      "The Board of Directors is interested in a holistic review of the football recruiting environment, and camps are a piece of that puzzle," said South Carolina president Harris Pastides, who serves as the chairman of the board of directors. "We share the council's interest in improving the camp environment, and we support the council's efforts to create a model that emphasizes the scholastic environment as an appropriate place for recruiting future student-athletes."

  • Idaho drops to FCS level
    By The Sports Xchange / Thursday, April 28, 2016

    The University of Idaho is dropping in status to the Football Championship Subdivision level beginning in 2018, the school announced Thursday.

    • Idaho will remain at the Football Bowl Subdivision level for the next two seasons. The move must still be formally approved by the Idaho State Board of Education.

      The Vandals will join the Big Sky Conference, the league they were in before jumping up to FBS in 1996.

      "I understand the magnitude of this decision and the strong opinions that surround it, both for and against, but joining the Big Sky Conference is the best possible course for our athletics program and for our university," Idaho president Chuck Staben said in a statement. "We have carefully weighed our options and concluded that competing as an independent with an extremely uncertain future conference affiliation would be irresponsible when we have the alternative of joining one of the most stable FCS conferences.

      "The Big Sky allows us to renew traditional rivalries and offers our athletes the opportunity to excel, just as they do in our other Big Sky sports programs."

      Idaho has been pondering its future since being notified by the Sun Belt in March that the school's membership would not be renewed after the 2017 football season.

      "We are extremely motivated to compete in the Sun Belt for the next two years and then align with like institutions that make geographic sense in the Big Sky Conference that will provide our student-athletes with a quality experience," athletic director Rob Spear said in the statement.

      Idaho made the 1996 jump from the Big Sky along with Boise State but was unable to compete at the higher level.

      In the 20 seasons since moving into the largest division of college football, Idaho struggled to be competitive, averaging just 3.7 wins and posting just three winning seasons.

      The current stint with the Sun Belt began in 2014 and is the school's second stretch in the league.

      A move to FCS means the football program will reduce the number of scholarships, per NCAA guidelines, to 63 from 85.

      Other football members of the Big Sky are Cal Poly, Eastern Washington, Idaho State, Montana, Montana State, North Dakota, Northern Arizona, Northern Colorado, Portland State, Sacramento State, Southern Utah, UC Davis and Weber State.

  • Report: Idaho to drop down to FCS
    By The Sports Xchange / Wednesday, April 27, 2016

    The University of Idaho is set to become the first program in history to move from FBS to the FCS level.

    • According to multiple reports, the school is expected to announce Thursday that its football program will rejoin the Big Sky Conference, which is made up of FCS schools.

      The Vandals played football in the Big Sky from 1963 to 1995. In the 20 years since moving into the largest division of college football, Idaho struggled to be competitive, averaging just 3.7 wins and posting just three winning seasons.

      Idaho and New Mexico State were dropped in April by the Sun Belt Conference as football-playing members. The schools are halfway through a four-year associate membership with the Sun Belt and will remain in the conference through 2017.

      If Idaho had stayed in FBS, it likely would have played as an independent, which is considered cost prohibitive for the school. The Vandals finished with a 4-8 record last year.

      A move to FCS means the football program will reduce the number of scholarships, per NCAA guidelines, to 63 from 85.

      Other football members of the Big Sky are Cal Poly, Eastern Washington, Idaho State, Montana, Montana State, North Dakota, Northern Arizona, Northern Colorado, Portland State, Sacramento State, Southern Utah, UC Davis and Weber State.

  • Stepfather sues projected early draft pick Tunsil
    By The Sports Xchange / Wednesday, April 27, 2016

    Laremy Tunsil is facing another lawsuit from his stepfather as the former Ole Miss offensive tackle prepares for the NFL Draft.

    • Lindsey Miller, Tunsil's stepfather, alleges in the suit that Tunsil attacked him last June and verbally abused him, leading to "intentional infliction of emotional distress." Tunsil said he was acting in defense of his mother.

      Tunsil is expected to be among the first names called after the draft begins Thursday night in Chicago.

      Miller wants compensatory and punitive damages, attorney fees, pre- and post-judgment interest and all costs associated with the suit because of "past, present and future bodily injury, pain and suffering, severe emotional distress, medical costs, damage to reputation, and/or other types of damages that he has incurred (and will likely continue to incur)," according to the Jackson Clarion-Ledger.

      Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze is mentioned in the suit.

      "Defendant Tunsil knew, or should have known, that Coach Hugh Freeze, in particular, would repeat his remarks to local, state, and/or national media given Defendant Tunsil's critical role on the Ole Miss football team. In fact, Coach Freeze and/or others did just that. As a result, Defendant Tunsil's malicious statements, as repeated by Coach Freeze and others, caused irreparable damage to Mr. Miller's reputation, the nature and scope of which will be determined at trial."

      The case was dropped last August with Tunsil and Miller agreed not to pursue domestic violence charges.

      Tunsil also was ruled last year to have received impermissible benefits and was suspended for the first seven games of Ole Miss' 2015 season.

      The NCAA determined after an investigation that Tunsil had access to "three separate loaner vehicles over a sixth-month period without payment, a four-month interest-free promissory note on $3,000 down payment for purchasing a used vehicle, two nights of lodging at a local home, an airline ticket and one day use of a rental vehicle."

      NFLDraftScout.com projects that Tunsil will be the No. 6 pick in this year's draft. He finished his college career allowing just two sacks in 29 games.

  • Eastern Michigan: We're not dropping football
    By The Sports Xchange / Tuesday, April 26, 2016

    Eastern Michigan responded to a report that suggested students and faculty favored dropping football at the school by saying Tuesday that it plans to continue playing at the Football Bowl Subdivision level.

    • A letter signed by interim president Donald Loppnow, president-elect James Smith and members of the Board of Regents called the report that appeared in the Detroit Free Press false.

      There are "absolutely no plans to eliminate football or move into any other division or conference," the administration said in the letter. "Any headlines or claims that Eastern is considering dropping football, or reducing our support of the program in any way, are false."

      Eastern Michigan plays in the Mid-American Conference, which is made up of FBS teams in football and Division I programs in all other sports.

      The Free Press reported that faculty and students wanted the university to drop football as a cost-saving measure or move to lower levels in Division II or Division III, citing the program's lack of competitiveness.

      "Culturally and geographically, EMU football will simply never succeed from an attendance and financial standpoint," faculty member Howard Bunsis told the Board of Regents at a meeting on Friday.

      "It is a losing proposition -- always has been, and always will be. We hardly raise any money for football, and our attendance is the lowest in the country. Some of you believe that we are close to succeeding, if we just throw more money at the situation. This proposition is insane."

      The administration's response came Tuesday in an open letter that read:

      "In the past several days, there has been considerable media coverage of reports that indicate that Eastern Michigan University is considering eliminating football, or reducing support for football by dropping down to a lower division of the NCAA and by dropping out of the Mid-American Conference. These reports are not based on any solid factual information. We have absolutely no plans to eliminate football or move into any other division or conference.

      "We are pleased to be a member of an outstanding conference, the Mid-American Conference, where all of our sports and our talented student-athletes have the opportunity to compete at the highest levels with neighboring institutions in the Midwest. Any headlines or claims that Eastern is considering dropping football, or reducing our support of the program in any way, are false.

      "We are 100 percent supportive of our current Athletics administration, particularly Vice President of Intercollegiate Athletics Heather Lyke. She has assembled an outstanding support team and we already have seen positive results in terms of continuing Eastern's championship traditions in a number of our sports, as well as in many new initiatives to increase revenues. As an example, year-to-date, fundraising has increased by nearly $430,000.

      "Two-and-a-half years ago, she hired an outstanding football coach in Chris Creighton. Now entering his third year and with the majority of the team now made up of his recruits, we believe the best is ahead in terms of on the field and academic performance. We believe very strongly in Coach Creighton and his efforts to rebuild the program.

      "We want to collectively reiterate that any notion, suggestion, or headline that in any way suggests Eastern is considering eliminating football or moving into another conference or division, is absolutely false. We will remain proud members of the Mid-American Conference football family for a long, long time."

  • Department of Justice looking into satellite-camp decision
    By The Sports Xchange / Monday, April 25, 2016

    The NCAA's controversial decision to shut down satellite camps has caught the eye of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    • According to USA Today, the department has begun an informal inquiry to determine whether banning such camps jeopardizes opportunities for lower-income students to earn scholarships.

      On April 8, the NCAA Division I council voted to shut down satellite camps, saying schools could only conduct clinics or camps at their own facilities.

      A number of schools use satellite camps to study prospects outside their normal recruiting region. Michigan, for one, has held a number of such camps in the heart of the Southeastern Conference.

      As expected, the NCAA decision was met by some schools, specifically Big Ten schools Ohio State and Michigan, with disdain.

      Ohio State's Urban Meyer was vocally upset and talked about the demise of such camps and how hundreds of players have earned scholarships thanks to these camps.

      "I wish they'd revisit that part of it. I think there's a knee-jerk reaction because people complained and I get that," Meyer explained earlier this month.

      The NCAA Division I Board of Directors is scheduled to meet on Thursday in Indianapolis to approve rules passed by the council.

  • Miami suspends RB Walton
    By The Sports Xchange / Saturday, April 23, 2016

    Sophomore running back Mark Walton of the Miami Hurricanes was suspended from the team following a recent arrest, the university confirmed on Saturday to Local10 News.

    • The Associated Press reported that Walton was charged with DUI and that other charges are pending.

      "We are aware of the situation regarding Mark Walton and we have taken immediate action by suspending him from the team," Athletics Director Blake James told Local 10 News. "We have no further comment at the time."

      Walton amassed 1,054 all-purpose yards and scored 10 touchdowns for the Hurricanes last season. He rushed for 56 yards on 10 carries in Miami's spring game.

  • Notre Dame to end Shamrock Series
    By The Sports Xchange / Thursday, April 21, 2016

    Notre Dame plans a modified schedule marked with major programs and the end of the Shamrock Series.

    • Athletic director Jack Swarbrick said after this year's Nov. 12 game with Army the Shamrock Series, in which Notre Dame plays a relocated home game in a major city, the series will be paused to allow the Irish to maximize its home schedule.

      That revised schedule could soon include a renewal of the rivalry with Michigan, which has the support of Wolverines coach Jim Harbaugh and the new atheltic administration staff.

      Swarbrick told ESPN "some remarkably challenging" games would be announced soon as Notre Dame attempts to keep up with the daunting schedules of other major football powerhouses bound by a conference schedule, such as Alabama and Clemson.

      "That's our obligation in this system," Swarbrick said. "Our 12 better compare with anybody's 13. That's the way we're approaching scheduling."

  • Syracuse DBs Scissum, Winfield allegedly stabbed by ex-teammate
    By The Sports Xchange / Sunday, April 17, 2016

    Former Syracuse football player Naesean Howard has been charged with stabbing two of his former teammates, according to published reports Sunday.

    • Howard allegedly stabbed defensive backs Chauncey Scissum and Corey Winfield on Saturday. Winfield is listed in stable condition at Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse, while Scissum is resting comfortably.

      Police said both Scissum and Winfield were stabbed multiple times and had non-life threatening injuries. It was unclear what prompted the stabbings.

      Howard, 20, was charged with two counts of second-degree assault and criminal possession of a weapon. He was dismissed from the football team during the 2014 season.

      "We are aware of this incident and our focus right now is on supporting our two students as they recover," Syracuse senior vice president of public affairs Kevin Quinn said in a statement. "The accused individual, who knew the victims, has been suspended from the university indefinitely. We do not tolerate any act of violence and the safety of our campus and community is a top priority."

      Scissum, 21, is a junior safety who had 43 tackles in 2015. Winfield is a junior cornerback who had 30 tackles, two interceptions and two sacks last season.

  • Cal settles Agu wrongful death suit for $4.75M
    By The Sports Xchange / Thursday, April 14, 2016

    Three months after publicly accepting the university was negligent in the death of former football player Ted Agu, Cal-Berkeley reached an agreement on a $4.75 million settlement of a wrongful death suit.

    • "The university is glad to have reached a resolution with the Agu family, as it has been a difficult process for everyone involved," UC Berkeley spokesperson Dan Mogulof said Thursday. "Now UC Berkeley can continue to focus its energies on enhancing the safety and well-being of student-athletes."

      Almost two years passed before Cal admitted fault in January.

      Agu died Feb. 7, 2014, at age 21 after a conditioning drill during offseason workouts.

      A medical examiner initially identified the cause of his collapse during a drill as a heart condition. It was later determined that Agu's death was associated with a sickle cell trait that made him more susceptible to heat stroke and the breakdown of muscle during high-intensity workouts.

      Since Agu's death, new policies and protocols are in place, including prohibiting the use of "high-risk physical activity" as punishment. The reform was required as part of the settlement and insisted upon by the Agu family.

      The conditioning drill involving a weighted rope and sprinting up and down a steep inclined street 10 times. Teammates deposed said Agu was clearly struggling for a long period of time before coaches and trainers came to his aid. One teammate, offensive lineman Matt Cochran, said in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle that he saw Agu fall several times.

      "On behalf of the family, we are pleased that Cal has accepted responsibility, monetarily acknowledged the enormity of the loss suffered, and taken critically important reforms aimed at preventing these tragedies from occurring to others," Steve Yerrid, an attorney for the Agu family, said in a statement.

  • Petrino gets new seven-year deal from Louisville
    By The Sports Xchange / Thursday, April 14, 2016

    Louisville and head football coach Bobby Petrino on Thursday agreed to a new seven-year deal that keeps the 55-year-old Petrino with the Cardinals through 2023.

    • Petrino led the Cardinals to an 8-5 record and a win in the Music City Bowl over Texas A&M last season

      "I do like where we are at right now," Petrino told wlyk.com. "I really think that as a program we are making strides in the right direction. Academically, our guys are graduating at the end of their eligibility. ... I think that's something that's important and something that's been different my second time back," Petrino added.

      Petrino becomes the third highest paid coach in the ACC behind Clemson's Dabo Swinney and Florida State's Jimbo Fisher. According to reports, the deal is worth $30.6 million.

      Since returning to Louisville two years ago, Petrino has worked his magic leading the Cardinals to a 17-9 record and a pair of bowl bids.

      He previously led the Cardinals from 2003 to 2006 and in each season Louisville went to a bowl game.

      "I love the growth of this program," athletic director Tom Jurich said. "I love how the young kids are developing. I love how our old kids are graduating."

  • Former Baylor DE Oakman faces sexual assault charge
    By The Sports Xchange / Wednesday, April 13, 2016

    Former Baylor defensive end Shawn Oakman, who was expected to be taken in the upcoming NFL Draft, was arrested on charges that he sexually assaulted a female Baylor student earlier this month, the Waco Tribune reported Wednesday.

    • NFLdraftscout.com projected Oakman to be taken in the third round of the draft, ranking him as the 11th-best defensive end prospect and the 92nd-best prospect overall.

      A charge as serious sexual assault could hurt his draft status significantly.

      According to the Tribune report, Oakman, Baylor's career sack leader, was waiting to be booked into the jail Wednesday afternoon.

      Waco police searched his residence on April 3 looking for evidence to support the woman's allegation that she was sexually assaulted by Oakman.

      Oakman told Waco police the sexual contact was consensual.

      The police affidavit said the woman claimed she met Oakman at a Waco bar and asked her if she wanted to go to his residence. Once they got to Oakman's residence, she claimed he forced her into a bedroom.

      The Tribune reported that court records showed the woman went to the hospital after the alleged assault and was examined by a sexual assault nurse examiner.

      Oakman, 24, graduated from Baylor in December.

      He sent a message on his Twitter account at 8:06 a.m. April 3 that said, "The devil will come and try to strip you of everything you worked for."

      If Oakman is found guilty, this incident would affect his chances of being drafted, especially after he was dismissed from the team at Penn State as a redshirt freshman, reportedly for grabbing the wrist of a store clerk.

      Strictly from a football perspective, Oakman was not as highly regarded by scouts as his hype might suggest.

      At an imposing 6 feet 8 and 287 pounds, Oakman certainly has the frame and physique of a highly drafted NFL prospect. With a three-sack performance in the Senior Bowl a noteworthy exception, however, Oakman's production rarely matched his perceived potential in 2015, when his sack numbers dropped from a career-high 11 in 2014 to just 4.5 this past season.

      He had a significant dropoff from his breakout 2014 season.

  • Iowa DE Ott loses medical hardship appeal
    By The Sports Xchange / Wednesday, April 13, 2016

    Iowa defensive end Drew Ott was denied a medical hardship waiver for an extra year of eligibility and will enter the 2016 NFL Draft.

    • Ott confirmed Wednesday that the NCAA rejected his appeal for a fifth year with the Hawkeyes. He suffered elbow and knee injuries last season that limited him to six games.

      For months, Ott had waited for a decision and was unable to work out for NFL teams while in limbo and because of his injuries. The Big Ten approved a waiver, but the NCAA did not agree, ending his career at Iowa after four seasons.

      Iowa argued that while Ott played in more than 30 percent of the Hawkeyes' 14 games last season, he missed significant time in those games because of the injuries. A dislocated elbow suffered in the second game limited Ott's playing time before he sustained a torn ACL in the sixth game that ended his season -- and ultimately his college career.

      "Finding out that my time has come to an end here at Iowa leaves me with a lot of people to thank," Ott said in an Instagram post. "Thank you to my coaches for giving me the opportunity, believing in me, and staying with me through this whole process. Hawkeye fans, you have been amazing and thank you for the constant support. I wouldn't have been able to do any of this without my friends and family."

      Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz expressed dissatisfaction with the decision, particularly with the length of the process.

      "I'm disappointed for Drew and I'm really quite frankly disappointed with the decision and disappointed with the process," Ferentz said.

      With Ott now gone from the program, redshirt freshman Matt Nelson will be the favorite to start at defensive end next fall. He filled in last year after Ott went down.

      Ott was named second-team All-Big Ten after the 2014 season when he led the team in tackles for loss with 12 and sacks with eight. He started 31 of the final 32 games of his Iowa career, including 19 straight before the injuries, after playing in five games as a true freshman in 2012.

  • USC hires Swann as new AD
    By The Sports Xchange / Wednesday, April 13, 2016

    USC named Lynn Swann as the Trojans' new athletic director to succeed Pat Haden on July 1, the school announced Wednesday.

    • The 64-year-old Swann, a Pro Football Hall of Famer, becomes the third consecutive former USC football player to hold the position.

      Haden announced in February that he will retire on June 30.

      Swann, a four-time Super Bowl champion with the Pittsburgh Steelers as their wide receiver, was selected with the 21st overall pick of the NFL Draft in 1974. After his playing days, Swann went on to a lengthy broadcasting career.

      "To his new role, Lynn Swann will bring the heart and soul of a Trojan," USC president Max Nikias said in a statement. "He shares our profound dedication to combining academic excellence with athletic excellence."

      Swann won a national championship at USC while playing for coach John McKay in 1972 when the Trojans went 12-0. He is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. He graduated from the university with a bachelor's degree in public relations.

      "I am excited about coming back to USC -- its growth and success under President Nikias has been phenomenal and my family and I are looking forward to being a part of that," Swann said. "As athletic director, my goals for the student-athletes will be to graduate, to win and to experience.

      "USC opened doors for me. I learned about myself, and my education created a pathway to go forward. I was always looking toward preparing for that career beyond football."

      USC has scheduled a news conference with Swann on Thursday.

      The 63-year-old Haden, a former USC quarterback, will remain with the school for one year to help guide the renovation of the Coliseum. He has run the Trojans' athletic department for 5 1/2 years, taking over from Mike Garrett, a former USC running back, in 2010.

      Former USC head coach Pete Carroll, now with the Seattle Seahawks, took to Twitter to congratulate Swann.

      "Excited to hear Lynn Swann is the next Athletic Director at USC! He will be an outstanding leader and great champion for the Trojan cause!" Carroll tweeted.

      Former USC player Ronnie Lott wrote on Twitter, "Lynn Swann is a Hall Of Fame person and leader. This is wonderful news."

  • Michigan's Harbaugh criticizes satellite camp ban
    By The Sports Xchange / Tuesday, April 12, 2016

    The NCAA's ban on satellite camps last week drew angry responses from Michigan's Jim Harbaugh and other coaches.

    • In an interview with SI.com published Tuesday, Harbaugh called the NCAA incompetent and hypocritical, saying "I suggest we drop the term 'student-athlete' for consistency."

      "During the NCAA basketball tournament, we discuss the term 'student-athlete' ad nauseam in promoting our governing institution and our member institutions," Harbaugh said. "Then, when we have an opportunity to truly promote the 'student-athlete' with a concept shared by educators and football men from all backgrounds, our leadership goes into hiding."

      At the heart of the NCAA's ruling was a reaction to Harbaugh taking his coaching staff around the country last summer for the satellite camps.

      "I mean, what's it based on? A survey? There wasn't a lot of discussion or study," Harbaugh said. " ... This is going to affect thousands and thousands of people."

      Harbaugh and others believe the Southeastern Conference and Atlantic Coast Conference were being protected by the ruling.

      "It seems to be outrage by the SEC and ACC," Harbaugh said. "They power-brokered that out ... the image that comes to my mind is guys in a back room smoking cigars, doing what they perceive is best for them. It certainly isn't the best thing for the youngsters. It's not the best thing for the student-athletes."

      Harbaugh pointed to comments made earlier by Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze that he was pleased with the decision because traveling to satellite camps took him away from his family.

      "You've got a guy sitting in a big house, making $5 million a year, saying he does not want to sacrifice his time," Harbaugh said. "That is not a kindred spirit to me. What most of these coaches are saying is they don't want to work harder."

      Nebraska coach Mike Riley said the ruling surprised him. The Big Ten was the only power conference to vote against banning satellite camps. The SEC, ACC, Big 12 and also the Mountain West and Sun Belt supported the ban.

      "I don't know how they vote," Riley told the Lincoln Journal-Star. "I talked to (Washington coach) Chris Petersen and we both were wondering how in the end this all gets decided."

      Riley, like Harbaugh, thinks the biggest losers are the high school athletes who are being recruited.

      "I still frankly don't get it," Riley said. "I just see it more simply as an opportunity for both coaches and players. I think us going to Atlanta and having a camp, and some guy down there, we find, or he finds us, and he changes his life and changes Nebraska's life, I think those are all good stories. It's just more opportunity."

  • College football notebook: Clemson's Swinney agrees to $30 million extension
    By The Sports Xchange / Tuesday, April 12, 2016

    Clemson approved a five-year, $30.75 million extension for head coach Dabo Swinney.

    • Swinney's base salary is $245,000 in 2016 and remains the same for the duration of the contract, which expires in 2021. He can earn $3.505 million in supplemental income and $800,000 in licensing in 2016.

      The total compensation package puts Swinney among the 10 highest-paid college football coaches. Swinney can earn more than $4 million in supplemental income from 2018-2021.

      Hired in 2008, Swinney is 75-27 as head coach and led Clemson to the ACC championship and a runner-up finish in the 2016 national championship game. The Tigers lost to Alabama in the College Football Playoff in Arizona in January.

      ---Former Illinois head coach Tim Beckman, fired before the 2015 season amidst allegations of mistreatment by former players, reached a $250,000 settlement with the university.

      "The University of Illinois and former Coach Tim Beckman announced that they have reached a negotiated resolution of potential legal claims relating to Coach Beckman's termination in August 2015," the university's statement began. In resolving these matters, the university and Coach Beckman seek to avoid protracted and costly litigation that would by necessity require the involvement of a number of current and former student-athletes, as well as coaches, staff, trainers, and team physicians.

      "This resolution allows the university to avoid the distraction of pending litigation and to focus instead on the well-being of student-athletes in the program. At the same time, Coach Beckman can resume his career without protracted litigation. The resolution involves a one-time payment of $250,000 to Beckman, who will release all claims he may have had against the university."

      Several former Illinois players accused Beckman of mistreatment during his tenure as head coach.

      ---Former Boise State starting quarterback Ryan Finley is transferring from the school, coach Bryan Harsin announced.

      Finley started the first three games last season before suffering a broken ankle in a game against Idaho State. His injury opened the door for true freshman Brett Rypien to take over and Rypien passed for 3,353 yards, 20 touchdowns and eight interceptions.

      Harsin said the quarterback job was open entering spring football drills but Finley apparently realized that wasn't truly the case. Finley, who has two seasons of eligibility remaining, plans to graduate in May and then transfer to a school in which he will be able to play immediately.

  • Boise State QB Finley is transferring
    By The Sports Xchange / Tuesday, April 12, 2016

    Former Boise State starting quarterback Ryan Finley is transferring from the school, coach Bryan Harsin announced Tuesday.

    • Finley started the first three games last season before suffering a broken ankle in a game against Idaho State. His injury opened the door for true freshman Brett Rypien to take over and Rypien passed for 3,353 yards, 20 touchdowns and eight interceptions.

      Harsin said the quarterback job was open entering spring football drills but Finley apparently realized that wasn't truly the case.

      Finley plays to graduate in May and then transfer to a school in which he will be able to play immediately.

      "We wish Ryan the best," Harsin said. "He is going to leave Boise State with a degree, and that is what this is all about.

      Finley passed for 485 yards, one touchdown and four interceptions prior to the injury.

      Finley has two seasons of eligibility remaining.

  • Illinois to pay Beckman $250K
    By The Sports Xchange / Tuesday, April 12, 2016

    Former Illinois head coach Tim Beckman, fired before the 2015 season amidst allegations of mistreatment by former players, reached a $250,000 settlement with the university on Tuesday.

    • "The University of Illinois and former Coach Tim Beckman announced that they have reached a negotiated resolution of potential legal claims relating to Coach Beckman's termination in August 2015. In resolving these matters, the university and Coach Beckman seek to avoid protracted and costly litigation that would by necessity require the involvement of a number of current and former student-athletes, as well as coaches, staff, trainers, and team physicians.

      "This resolution allows the university to avoid the distraction of pending litigation and to focus instead on the well-being of student-athletes in the program. At the same time, Coach Beckman can resume his career without protracted litigation. The resolution involves a one-time payment of $250,000 to Beckman, who will release all claims he may have had against the university."

      Beckman will be paid out of the university insurance fund.

      A long investigation into the allegations resulted in the firing of athletic director Mike Thomas in November. Thomas was found guilty of no wrongdoing, but he was let go as the details of the investigation were released.

      Several former Illinois players accused Beckman of mistreatment during his tenure as head coach.

      The coach "pushed players and athletic trainers beyond reasonable limits in systematic fashion" according to the school.

      Illinois hired former Chicago Bears and Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach Lovie Smith in January.

  • Clemson, Swinney agree to $30M extension
    By The Sports Xchange / Tuesday, April 12, 2016

    Clemson approved a five-year, $30.75 million extension for head coach Dabo Swinney.

    • Swinney's base salary is $245,000 in 2016 and remains the same for the duration of the contract, which expires in 2021. He can earn $3.505 million in supplemental income and $800,000 in licensing in 2016.

      The total compensation package puts Swinney among the 10 highest-paid college football coaches.

      Swinney can earn more than $4 million in supplemental income from 2018-2021.

      Hired in 2008, Swinney is 75-27 as head coach and led Clemson to the ACC championship and a runner-up finish in the 2016 national championship game. The Tigers lost to Alabama in the College Football Playoff in Arizona in January.

  • Meyer on new texting rule: Most ignorant thing I've ever heard
    By The Sports Xchange / Monday, April 11, 2016

    Ohio State coach Urban Meyer has a message for the NCAA after learning that the governing body of college sports made some significant changes late last week.

    • The NCAA on Friday banned satellite camps as well as now making it possible for a high school player to receive thousands of text messages from coaches.

      "The texting thing is the most ignorant thing I've ever heard in my life," Meyer said Monday after the Buckeyes' morning practice. "Do you really want text messages from 100 universities on your phone when you come out of school? The ones I know don't."

      At first, Meyer seemed more upset about the change in the texting policy, but then reflected on the demise of satellite camps, how coaches benefit from working at off-campus camps and how hundreds of players have earned scholarships thanks to these camps.

      When he was at Bowling Green, he and his staff would make the drive to Columbus to take part in Ohio State's camps and see players, who they could potentially offer scholarships.

      "I wish they'd revisit that part of it. I think there's a knee-jerk reaction because people complained and I get that," Meyer explained. "It's a slippery slope. I'm not worried about the high-level players, because they're going to find a way to get where they need to get.

      "I'm talking about, there's a big chunk of players who deserve to play major college football. I'm not saying it's right or wrong, because I don't really know. But you should always think first about the players."

      One of Meyer's solutions is to allow student-athletes to have a voice on some changes, while adding his comments were not "anti-NCAA."

  • NCAA shuts down new bowls for three years
    By The Sports Xchange / Monday, April 11, 2016

    The NCAA has approved a three-year moratorium on new bowl games until 2019 at the earliest, according to reports Monday.

    • ESPN reported that members of the NCAA Division I Council are evaluating whether future bowl eligibility should be determined by teams earning a winning record or simply reaching .500.

      The NCAA Division I Council's decision comes a year after there were not enough bowl-eligible teams to fill the record 41 postseason games. As a result, three teams with losing records -- Minnesota, Nebraska and San Jose State -- were awarded bowl berths, setting an NCAA record.

      The NCAA ruling affects three cities trying to add bowl games in 2016 -- Austin, Texas; Myrtle Beach, S.C., Carolina and Charleston, S.C.

      This is the second time in the past five years that the NCAA has issued a hold on new bowls. When the last three-year moratorium was lifted in 2014, six new bowls were added over the next two years -- the Bahamas, Boca Raton, Camellia and Miami Beach bowls in 2014 and the Arizona and Cure bowls in 2015.

  • Ex-Vanderbilt player found guilty of rape in retrial
    By The Sports Xchange / Saturday, April 9, 2016

    Former Vanderbilt football player Cory Batey was found guilty by a jury late Friday night of aggravated rape in the assault of an unconscious woman in a dorm room after a retrial in Nashville, Tenn.

    • The jury of nine men and three women deliberated about 2 1/2 hours to find Batey guilty of aggravated rape, two counts of attempted aggravated rape, facilitation of aggravated rape and three counts of aggravated sexual battery.

      The jury heard five days of testimony and reached the verdict about 11 p.m. CT.

      Batey, a 22-year-old from Nashville, was taken into custody immediately.

      Batey was one of four former Vanderbilt football players charged with rape and accused of assaulting the female student in a dorm room in June 2013. Batey was the only one on trial.

      A jury last year convicted Batey and teammate Brandon Vandenburg on multiple aggravated rape and aggravated sexual battery charges, but a judge declared a mistrial in the case. It was later discovered that the jury foreman was a statutory rape victim 15 years ago but intentionally withheld that information.

      Vandenburg is scheduled for retrial in June. The two others charged are Jaborian "Tip" McKenzie and Brandon E. Banks, and their cases are pending.

  • NCAA bans satellite camps
    By The Sports Xchange / Friday, April 8, 2016

    No more spring practices in Florida for Michigan after the NCAA closed the loophole for satellite camps, effective immediately, in a ruling Friday.

    • The SEC proposed the rule in response to Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh's spring practices and satellite camps, possibly giving him recruiting advantages. Harbaugh scheduled four Michigan practices at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., from Feb. 28-March 4, and was scheduled to coach at football camps this summer in Georgia, Florida, Virginia, Alabama, Mississippi and Texas.

      The NCAA shut down satellite camps after the ruling by the Division I Council that requires FBS programs to conduct all clinics at school facilities or facilities regularly used for practice or competition.

      "The Council approved a proposal applicable to the Football Bowl Subdivision that would require those schools to conduct camps and clinics at their school's facilities or at facilities regularly used for practice or competition," the NCAA stated Friday. "Additionally, FBS coaches and noncoaching staff members with responsibilities specific to football may be employed only at their school's camps or clinics. This rule change is effective immediately."

      The SEC and ACC ban their coaches from such satellite camps at destinations outside a 50-mile radius from their schools. The SEC would have lifted its ban if the new NCAA rule did not pass.

      The shots first came in February from SEC commissioner Greg Sankey and then ACC commissioner John Swofford after Harbaugh announced plans to take the Wolverines to Florida.

      Harbaugh had called the criticism "comical" and NCAA president Mark Emmert had voiced his disapproval of Michigan's practices in Florida.

      Alabama head coach Nick Saban spoke out against satellite camps in advance of the council's ruling.

      "I'm really not even thinking that it has that much value," Saban told AL.com on Thursday. "What would be a more interesting question for you to research -- and I can't answer this -- the teams that have done them, what value does it serve? How many players did they get? They had some players commit to them and some of those players decommitted, and I know they even wanted to drop some of those players when they found out they could get better players."